Should You Come Out (as a writer) at Work?

It’s happened again.

This morning, my Google Alert told me that my name had been mentioned somewhere out there in the cyber galaxy.

Was it a glowing online review? Some writer blogger mentioning or  (or damning–who knows?) my book for writers? Some agent who had come upon my last novel and now, she or he had a question or a quibble or a hot writers’ advance for the next book?

It was none of these.

Instead, it was a press release that I posted at work as part of my job as a communications director for a non-profit here in Massachusetts.

Dang. It’s not that I’m disappointed that the search engines are picking up my work-generated press releases, but I don’t like this public link between my paid work (aka, the day job) and my life as a creative writer.

I hate when that happens. In fact, I do everything I can to not have that happen, to keep  my day job and my writing life separate.  So I never stand in the lunch room blathering about last night’s rough draft. Or I never announce a new publication.

I don’t invite my colleagues to any of my public readings or panel discussions.

I never bring one of my books to work, and I never, ever mention my workplace on Twitter or on my author’s Facebook page. Sometimes, when and if a colleague reads a piece of mine or sees my name in the local newspaper (the arts, not the business section), I grow suddenly bashful and embarrassed, as if I’ve been caught out in a secret.

Why?

Mostly, I like to honor the requirements and ethics of my professional life and workplace. I feel grateful to have a job I like with colleagues I respect.  But then, I don’t write anything salacious or pornographic or outrageous. I don’t write on the job.  So what’s the harm in sharing my life with those people with whom I wait in line for the coffee machine?  Just as they tell me about their kids and their kids’ birthday parties, why can’t I share my extra-curricular life?

Mostly, I want my colleagues to see me as fitting and fulfilling the role I’m paid for. So I hesitate to introduce another variable of myself, to charge them with seeing me in another and separate light.

And make no mistake: They are separate. The worker me and the writer me are very different. Especially on those self-effacing and writer-blocked days, I like the worker me better. It’s a far more confident and competent version.  It’s a version that gets things done.

But mostly, I think I keep things separate because, even when I’m writing fiction, some part of that manuscript will reveal my past and my innermost thoughts and sensibilities.

Do I really want my colleagues to know that much about me?

How do you manage it? Really, I’d love to know. Do you allow colleagues or business associates to share in the joys and challenges of your writing?

Do you share rough drafts with your family or life partner or best friend?

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About Aine Greaney

I'm an Irish writer living in greater Boston. I've published four books--two novels, a small collection of short stories and a how-to writing book, "Writer with a Day Job" (Writers Digest Books). I've also published lots of short stories, essays and feature articles. My latest project, "What Brought You Here" is a non-fiction narrative about being an expatriate in America. Find me on Twitter @ainegreaney. Or at my author web page, www.ainegreaney.com. As well as creative writing, I am the communications director for a healthcare non-profit. I also lead creative writing workshops at various libraries, schools and arts programs. At my workshops, I've been inspired by lots of wonderful writers--most of whom work a day job!
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3 Responses to Should You Come Out (as a writer) at Work?

  1. I, too, work in a Communications Office. My first book is coming out next month but I’m not all that self conscious about mixing my work with my personal writing accomplishments. In fact, I just got the go ahead to plug my book in the next issue of the alumni magazine.

  2. Great post! You know- I have the exact same feelings about mixing my admin. day job with writing. It partly because I write genre fiction with occasionally specific graphic descriptions of sex and violence, and- in all honesty- I don’t want co-workers in a white collar environment to necessarily think of that when they think of me. (I’m still getting used to my Mom knowing about my writing work) Interestingly, however, I also teach as an adjunct in my other day job (I work a lot) and at the college where I teach, I have no trouble “coming out” as a writer. I think that’s because people expect their English Instructors to always be working on a novel anyway.

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